University of Nottingham

What a difference a warm day makes

by Ed Tripp, Nottingham

Temperature affects plant growth

The heather that I placed in sand in May has been growing well ever since.

The most striking thing is the difference in size of the plants between the different temperatures. The plants grown in the highest temperature are nearly twice the size of those grown in the coldest temperature (see pictures).

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Addressing Climate Change

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

Climate Change and Heathland

Labelled soil samplesSo all the dirt collecting has been done. It took two months and a good few thousand miles to get there, but I finally collected the three hundred soil samples that I needed. I can now work in the lab to find out what my data is showing about enzymes in heathland soils, and how this might be affecting heathland plants.

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The Dirt Collector Returns

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

More Ammonia

Here is the latest video in the Dirt Collector series. Here I am checking one of my ammonia posts to make sure that all is well. This particular one is on Clumber Park in Sherwood Forest.

 

 

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More Nitrogen Deposition

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

Sampling and Sabotage

Nitrogen deposition comes in many forms. It can be diffuse, deposited in rain or from industry, or it can be more localised, from a single farm stocked with cattle or chickens for example. I have already investigated the former with bioassays and modelled nitrogen data. But the latter can be so localised, a matter of hundreds of meters, that it cannot be modelled. Therefore, it has to be measured in the field.

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Lab-Field-Office - Part 3

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

Not all goes as planned.

As I discussed in my last post, by June I had started to collect lichen samples in order to investigate their recovery in heathlands. This process is simple. You go to a heathland site with some pots, scissors and gloves. After eventually finding a patch of lichen, you carefully cut off a small sample and put it in a pot to take back to the lab.

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Lab-Field-Office Part 2

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

The Thesis Begins

By May I was well into the second year of my project. The ultimate aims of a PhD are to produce new science, perhaps publish the data, and to produce a thesis for me to defend in a room full of experts at the end of the three years. The thesis will be a huge body of work, so it's best to start it earlier rather than later.

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Lab-Field-Office Part 1

by Ed Tripp, University of Nottingham

The varied life of a scientist

The end of my second year has passed, the third and final year of my PhD has begun. Time has flown by for two reasons: it's been extremely fun and rewarding, but also extremely busy. There is little time to take stock. My next few blog posts will summarise my experience as a scientist over the past six months.

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